Family structure variations in patterns and predictors of child victimization.

Academic Article

Abstract

  • In a national probability sample of 1,000 children aged 10-17, youth from single parent and stepfamilies experienced higher rates of several different kinds of victimization compared with youth living with two biological parents. Youth in stepfamilies had the highest overall rates of victimization and the greatest risk from family perpetrators, including biological parents, siblings, and stepparents. Elevated risk in stepfamilies was fully explained by their higher levels of family problems. Victimization risk in single parent families was more affected by their lower socioeconomic status and residence in more violence neighborhoods and schools.
  • Authors

    Status

    Publication Date

  • April 2007
  • Published In

    Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Child
  • Child Abuse
  • Child Abuse, Sexual
  • Conflict (Psychology)
  • Crime Victims
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Family Characteristics
  • Family Relations
  • Female
  • Health Surveys
  • Humans
  • Life Change Events
  • Male
  • Parenting
  • Parents
  • Risk Factors
  • Single Parent
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • United States
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Pubmed Id

  • 17535126
  • Start Page

  • 282
  • End Page

  • 295
  • Volume

  • 77
  • Issue

  • 2