When we feel good and bad about ourselves: self-esteem memories across cultures.

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Young adults in the United States, Croatia, and China described personal episodes of times when they felt especially good or bad about themselves. These self-esteem memories were either recent (episodes that occurred during the previous 4 weeks) or remote (episodes that occurred between the ages of 10 and 15). Systematic content differences between memories of positive and negative self-worth were apparent primarily for remote rather than for recent memories. Across cultures, long-lasting positive memories frequently represented achievement themes, whereas negative memories frequently represented social themes. Links between achievement success and positive self-regard, and between social distress and negative self-regard, are explained using theories of self-esteem and autobiographical memory.
  • Authors

  • Ivcevic, Zorana
  • Pillemer, David
  • Wang, Qi
  • Hou, Yubo
  • Tang, Huizhen
  • Mohoric, Tamara
  • Taksic, Vladimir
  • Status

    Publication Date

  • October 2008
  • Published In

  • Memory  Journal
  • Keywords

  • Adult
  • China
  • Croatia
  • Cross-Cultural Comparison
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Mental Recall
  • Self Concept
  • Statistics as Topic
  • Time Factors
  • United States
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Pubmed Id

  • 18720221
  • Start Page

  • 703
  • End Page

  • 711
  • Volume

  • 16
  • Issue

  • 7