Metabolic syndrome: comparison of prevalence in young adults at 3 land-grant universities.

Academic Article

Abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: The study examines metabolic syndrome (MetS) among college students at 3 geographically distinct US campuses. PARTICIPANTS: Undergraduates (N = 360; 68% women), 18 to 24 years of age, were recruited at each public university in January and February 2011. MetS prevalence was evaluated in 83% (n = 299) participants. METHODS: Anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical measures were collected in the fasted state. RESULTS: Twelve percent of college men and 6% of college women met the clinical definition of MetS. Males were more likely to have ≥ 2 individual MetS criteria than females (33% vs 16%; p < .05). Prevalence and individual criteria of MetS differed between the 3 regions. Obese and overweight students met significantly more MetS criteria and had higher C-reactive protein levels than normal-weight students (both p < .05). CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that MetS prevalence among college students differs by sex, weight status, and region. Further research is needed to identify effective, targeted interventions that are regionally appropriate for this population.
  • Authors

  • Morrell, Jesse
  • Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol
  • Quick, Virginia
  • Olfert, Melissa
  • Dent, Amanda
  • Carey, Gale B
  • Status

    Publication Date

  • 2014
  • Published In

    Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Blood Pressure
  • Body Weights and Measures
  • Female
  • Hematologic Tests
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Metabolic Syndrome
  • Prevalence
  • Residence Characteristics
  • Risk Factors
  • Sex Factors
  • Smoking
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Students
  • United States
  • Universities
  • Young Adult
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Pubmed Id

  • 24313691
  • Start Page

  • 1
  • End Page

  • 9
  • Volume

  • 62
  • Issue

  • 1