Developmental Stage of Onset, Poly-Victimization, and Persistence of Childhood Victimization: Impact on Adult Well-Being in a Rural Community-Based Study.

Academic Article

Abstract

  • The current study examines the persistence of victimization and poly-victimization (i.e., count of multiple types of victimization) across various stages of development (ages 0-5, 6-12, and 13-18) and the related impact on adult well-being. Participants were 2,098 adults from the Appalachian region of three Southern states. Eighty-two percent of participants reported at least one type of victimization during childhood. Among adult victims, 22.6% reported one victimization in one developmental stage (i.e., one stage, but no poly-victimization), 45.8% reported one victimization in more than one stage (i.e., persistent victimization, but no poly-victimization), 20.5% reported multiple types of victimization in one stage (i.e., poly-victimization), and 11.2% reported multiple types of victimization at more than one stage (i.e., persistent poly-victimization). Results indicated a linear decline in subjective well-being, mental health, and number of healthy days as victimization becomes more persistent across childhood and more diverse in types (i.e., poly-victimization). Study findings provide support for models of victimization that take both developmental trajectories and poly-victimization into account.
  • Authors

  • Mitchell, Kimberly
  • Moschella, Elizabeth
  • Hamby, Sherry
  • Banyard, Victoria
  • Status

    Publication Date

  • February 2020
  • Published In

  • Child Maltreatment  Journal
  • Keywords

  • Adaptation, Psychological
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Adult Survivors of Child Abuse
  • Aggression
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Crime Victims
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Life Change Events
  • Male
  • Mental Health
  • Risk Factors
  • Rural Population
  • Time Factors
  • Young Adult
  • child abuse
  • child victims
  • exposure to violence
  • long-term effects
  • poly-victimiation
  • psychosocial issues
  • repeat victimization
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Pubmed Id

  • 31284731
  • Start Page

  • 20
  • End Page

  • 31
  • Volume

  • 25
  • Issue

  • 1